Treacherous, frozen latitudes becoming hot destinations

Once upon a time, the ideal yachting expedition would involve calm seas, warm breezes and smooth sailing. The yachting season would follow the global circuit of chasing the sun and festivals, with promises of balmy nights and sun-soaked days. Now, however, extreme destinations are becoming a popular alternative for those who want their morning coffee served with a side of adrenaline. While the treacherous conditions may require the heartiest of captains and crew, the rewards of exciting adventure and exquisite landscapes are drawing many to the rugged ends of the Earth.

Some of the most obvious and immediate dangers of yachting through such high-latitude regions are the screaming winds and high seas associated with passing low pressure systems, but this does not discount other difficulties such as frigid temperatures, little or no available assistance in the event of emergency, drifting ice and thick, blinding fog.

When it comes to the volatile weather in the North polar regions, storm systems piggy back on the eastern-racing jet stream. When these systems reach the Eastern Seaboard and move offshore into the open Atlantic, they are often energized by the warm tropical waters hitchhiking along the Gulf Stream. These systems can often produce conditions in excess of 40-knot winds and 20-foot seas, with one storm after the next for months on end. The summer months are the best bet for lengthier breaks between storm systems, but no season is immune to nature’s fury. Taking into consideration a yacht’s top speed, maneuvering around the rapidly deteriorating sea state may prove to be challenging, and obtaining weather intelligence prior to departing is well-advised.

The infamous Northwest Passage, which connects the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean via the Arctic waters around Greenland and through Canada, offers an alternative route that shaves off a considerable amount of time from the normal route.  With diminishing ice volume in the region, the waters have become more navigable, and were most recently crossed in 2016 by the cruise ship Crystal Serenity, which took 28 days.

Looking toward extreme destinations in the Southern Hemisphere, the subantarctic islands to the south of New Zealand and South America can be the destination or merely a stop along the way to the actual Antarctic continent itself. The conditions in this region of the world tend to remain hostile year-round. Minimal land mass in the Southern Hemisphere allows for storm systems to travel thousands of miles uninterrupted. With little to no frictional effects of land to slow these winds, storms are able to maintain their edge, giving way to the nicknames associated with their line of latitude, such as the “Roaring Forties,” “Furious Fifties,” and “Screaming Sixties.” Long-range swells associated with these winds make the higher latitude Southern Hemisphere seas very tumultuous.

Whether it’s the promise of isolation that draws the visitor, as the more common yachting circuit may yield congested harbors and ports, or the promise of nightly auroras and glowing, moonlit glaciers, extreme destinations are on the rise. Seafarer, beware – it is not for the faint of heart.

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Weather Routing For Your Yachting Needs

Beautiful boats, gorgeous skies, and that yacht life ambiance fully in place  at the 2017 Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show.

We at Weather Forecast Solutions provide can provide your yacht with both images and forecast analyses to help you safely get from point A to B.  Interested?  Let’s talk!

 

Weathering Through the Yachting Season

Weather conditions are generally what drive the popularity of yachting season around the world. Most voyages are seeking the moderately warm breezes, long days, and pleasant waters.  Suffice to say, no one is pursuing 15 ft waves, freezing temperatures, or torrential rains.  While other determining factors such as cultural events, boat shows, and festivals also factor into intended routes, the weather is the general dictator on the scene.

Global pressure patterns will determine where and how wind patterns work, which ultimately control the associated wave heights and relative positioning of ocean currents.  Much like the phrase “work smarter not harder”, yachting also follows the same train of thought:  work with the elements and not against!  Riding with the currents can often save on fuel and can ensure a speedier ride.  It’s no coincidence that many of the global routes follow the natural flow of the water.

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Transoceanic voyages often follow the major ocean currents

Another major factor is precipitation patterns, as regional monsoon seasons can make for an extended wet ride. A seasonal wind pattern shift, such as ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation), is defined as a longitudinal shift in pressure patterns and winds which occur on average, every 2-7 years.

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El Niño typically weaken or reverse the easterly trade winds to become westerly, as seen in this image.  This enhances warmer water to reach the Eastern Pacific, which further increases rain potential.

In the warm phase of ENSO, El Niño, easterly winds weaken or reverse.  This causes the warmer waters to shift from the Western/Central Pacific towards the Eastern Pacific, piling up along the South America coast. The warmer waters instigate thunderstorm development, so in turn, higher precipitation occurs.  Another side effect of the excess water is that it reduces upwelling, which is the ability of the deeper, colder, more nutrient-rich water to make its way to the surface. Ocean currents are related to water temperatures, so this shift alters the local currents.

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La Niña enhances the easterly trade winds, forcing water mass to pile into the Western Pacific. As a result, this elevates precipitation in the Western Pacific.   Meanwhile deeper (cooler) water upwells in the Eastern Pacific, which can limit thunderstorm activity.

Conversely, during the cool phase of ENSO, La Niña, the exact opposite occurs:  The easterly winds strengthen, which piles the warmer waters towards the West Pacific.  This migration of water from the East to the West makes it easier for upwelling to occur along South America.  The repositioned warmer waters over the West Pacific increase thunderstorm activity, and therefore precipitation potential.

Further examination of popular global destinations reveal that prime yachting season aligns with capitalizing on the best weather that each location has to offer:

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Peak months for yachting around the world, often follow the seasons.

The tail ends months of peak seasons tend to be the most financially affordable, as they occur while seasons are still transitioning from undesirable winds/rain/temperatures to the more preferred conditions.  While the weather can still somewhat be iffy, this is generally when dock space, berths, and anchorages are plentiful and tourists are minimal.  As yacht owners and charters seek sublime weather, peak seasonal time also brings overwhelming tourists and limited availability, hence higher prices.

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Global boating tracks, created via OceanPassages

Of course some locations are blessed with a year round type yachting season, such as Florida or the Caribbean, maritime SE Asia, or generally anywhere that is located near the equator.  Approximately 12 hours of daylight bless the equatorial regions, with daylight decreasing as you head north of south of this line.  While that ideally works for most of the year, the real caveat occurs when this excessive heat produces or strengthens tropical cyclones.  Rapid intensification or a change in track may force a yacht to redirect its route with minimal notice, or scurry towards an available hurricane hole.

Predicting and tracking the development and movement of tropical cyclones can be very tricky, as it involves a working knowledge of a four dimensional science: How things are changing 1) from east to west 2) from north to south 3) from the surface of the earth throughout the atmospheric column 4) with time. Recent activity surrounding Hurricane Harvey was a prime example of how a tropical system can intensify in a very short amount of time, as it went from a category 1 [74-95 mph] to minimum category 4 [130-156mph] in less than 24 hours.

The open ocean is a nautical playground for many, to which weather writes the rules.  Knowing the best time to take to the high seas is important, to make the best of your adventure and your time!